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+ CONTACT US +

142 East Ontario Street
Floor 4
Chicago, Illinois 60611


Phone 800-621-1773,
Extension 8267
Fax 312-202-8441


Email AOBP

 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)


 

Q:   What should I do if my AOA membership has expired but I would like to sit for an upcoming exam?

A:    You should contact the AOA Member Services directly by phone at (800) 621-1773, option 1, or via email at msc@osteopathic.org.  Be sure to let Member Services know that you are looking to renew your unpaid membership dues because you are trying to sit for an exam.

Q:   How does the AOA provide proof of board certification to the public and credentialing entities?

A:    To find out if a doctor is board certified, you will need to go to www.doprofiles.org.   There is a section at the bottom of this webpage labeled, “Healthcare ORGS, CVOs, State Boards.”  Click on “Order Physician Profiles” and this will take you through the process to receive your physician’s profile.  Also, below this is a section labeled, “Sample Profile,” which will give you an example of what information the profile will provide. 

Q:   What is Resolution 56 and where do I find more information about it?

A:    If you obtained Board Certification by an ABMS Board and are interested in pursuing American Osteopathic Board Certification, you may be able to obtain eligibility for the American Osteopathic Board examinations through the AOA's Resolution 56, which grants eligibility to sit for the examination for ABMS-certified osteopathic physicians.

If you have any questions regarding Resolution 56, the contact person is Leo Morales-Egizi.  Leo can be reached at (800) 621-1773 ext. 8050 or via email at LMorales-Egizi@osteopathic.org.

Q:   What should I do to get my ACGME internship approved by the AOA or deemed “training complete”?

A:    To get your ACGME internship (Resolution 42) approved by the AOA, you will need to complete all of the necessary paperwork with the AOA Education Department.  Click here to find the following pertinent information:

  • Why Approve ACGME Training?
  • The Approval Process for:
    • The First Year (PGY-1 as an OGME-1)
      • Option 1 Approval Process
      • Resolution 42 Approval Process
    • Military Internship
  • Applications for the following:
    • Approval of ACGME PGY-1 Year Training as an AOA-Approved OGME-1 Year (Resolution 42)
    • Approval of Federal/Military Internship Training

If you have any questions regarding the AOA approval or training complete status of your internship, the contact person is Barbara Coleman.  Barbara can be reached at (800) 621-1773 ext. 8276 or via email at traineeservices@osteopathic.org.

Q:   What should I do to get my ACGME residency approved by the AOA or deemed “training complete”?

A:    To get your ACGME residency approved by the AOA, you will need to complete all of the necessary paperwork with the AOA Education Department.  Click here to find the following pertinent information:

  • Why Approve ACGME Training?
  • The Approval Process for:
    • Residency Training
  • Applications for the following:
    • AOA Approval of ACGME Training (Approval of Residency Training)

If you have any questions regarding the AOA approval or training complete status of your residency, the contact person is Maria Santiago.  Maria can be reached at (800) 621-1773 ext. 8276 or via email at traineeservices@osteopathic.org.

Q:   If physicians have multiple board certifications, what are the CME requirements?

A:    If a DO has multiple board certifications:

  • The DO must decide which board certification will be his/her primary. 
    • To monitor the board certification of your choice the osteopathic physicians must send a letter to the Division of CME to confirm their choice.
  • If the DO does not decide, the CME department will monitor the DOs most recent certification as his/her primary certification.
  • The DO should confer with each of their specialty certification boards if there are extra CME requirements designated by that certifying body. 
    • For example:  Nuclear Medicine requires an additional 25 hours.

*PLEASE NOTE:  These requirements will change when Osteopathic Continuous Certification (OCC) goes into effect in January 2013.

Q:   What should I do if I require special accommodations or I am a candidate who qualifies under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for special accommodations? 

A:    The Board has standard policies in place in order to accommodate ADA and special requests.  Please contact Ellen Woods with your questions or concerns.  Ellen can be reached at (800) 621-1773 ext. 8103 or via email at ewoods@osteopathic.org.  You may also review a copy of the Americans with Disabilities Act Special Testing Accommodations.

Q:   If I just sat for an exam, when will I receive my results? 

A:    Candidates will be informed of the results of the examination within 90 days following the examination date.  Successful candidates will receive a certificate.  The certificate will be awarded after the AOA Bureau of Osteopathic Specialists gives final approval of the exam process for each candidate. 

Q:   Is AOA membership required in order to keep my board certification? 

A:    Yes,  board certification is a "members only" benefit program.  In explanation, first, we note that the AOA incurs very substantial costs to develop and maintain its program of board certification, advocate for its recognition on an equal basis with ABMS and other certifying boards with hospitals, insurers and by federal, state and local governments. Consequently, we limit access to the certification program to members.

Second, in the AOA's view, board certification denotes more than passage of an examination. We believe the membership requirement adds value to the certification credential to the public because AOA members are required to maintain a license in good standing, adhere to a code of ethics and meet CME requirements.

We could point out several other reasons, but ultimately we think it’s fair to require physicians who promote themselves as "AOA Board certified" to actually be AOA members.

Q:   What if I cannot afford to pay my AOA membership dues?

A:    If dues payment is a problem, the AOA has a financial assistance program available. More information is available from the Membership Department.

*Special reduced rates may be available if you are facing medical hardship (learn more) or financial hardship (learn more) or if you are currently enrolled full-time in a postdoctoral education program.

Q:   I lost my Board Certification certificate and need an electronic (PDF) replacement for paperwork, how can I obtain a copy? 

A:    The electronic copy may be emailed to you at no cost.  However, you will first need to submit a Certificate Replacement Request Form,  with your signature and the date requesting the electronic copy of the certificate.

Q:   I lost my Board Certification certificate and would like a replica of the original certificate sent to me, how can I obtain a copy? 

A:    The certificate replica may be mailed to you at a cost.  You will also need to submit a Certificate Replacement Request Form,  with your signature and the date requesting the certificate replica.

Q:   How do the AOA certifying boards compare to the ABMS boards?

A:    Since 1939, the AOA has maintained a program of board certification for osteopathic physicians who complete residency training in programs approved by the AOA.  At present, the AOA certifies osteopathic physicians in 42 specialties and subspecialties, ranging from family practice and pediatrics to neuropsychiatry, through a certification process developed and administered by 18 specialty certifying boards.  Much like the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) model of board certification, AOA board certification is based upon completion of approved graduate medical education and passage of a psychometrically-valid rigorous examination process.

As evidence of the equivalence of its board certification program, AOA board certification enjoys recognition and acceptance by hospitals, third-party payers, and federal and state governmental agencies.  The AOA’s board certification program has been recognized by several congressional advisory panels and federal agencies, including the Council on Graduate Medical Education, Physician Payment Review Commission, the Surgeon General of the United States, the Department of Defense, and the Department of Veterans Affairs.  AOA-approved osteopathic certification is also recognized for participation in Medicaid as reaffirmed in Public Law 104-248 “Medicaid Certification Act of 1995.”

Q:   If I am in possession of a non-dated certificate, am I required to participate in the OCC process which includes the OCC examination?

A:    If a physician is in possession of a non-dated certificate, the physician is not required to participate in the OCC process. Members with non-dated certificates are strongly encouraged to participate in the OCC process.

Q:   Can I look up a physician’s or my own board certification status online?

A:    Yes, physicians may visit the Find A DO section of the AOA website to view their public profile.  Physicians should review their profile annually for accuracy.

Please note: All listed DOs are members of the AOA who are in good standing with the association. Business phone and address information may not be provided for all physicians. To find detailed practice information, please visit the physician's website, contact the physician's office, or contact your state osteopathic association. Physicians should report any missing or inaccurate data to msc@osteopathic.org.

 

 

 


Content Disclaimer: The information provided in the American Osteopathic Board of Pediatrics (AOBP) web site is provided for information purposes only and does not constitute a legal contract between the AOBP and any person or entity unless otherwise specified. Information on the AOBP website is subject to change without prior notice. Although every reasonable effort is made to present current and accurate information, the AOBP makes no guarantees of any kind.

©2013, American Osteopathic Board of Pediatrics
Operating under the authority of the American Osteopathic Association